Parenting

Doctors Share 9 Child Care Tips That Parents Are Thankful For


Science journalist Helen Pearson shared her experience of being a mother in a TED Talk and gave a good tip. She sets aside 15 minutes every night to talk to her kids about their day. Right after this, she makes them go to bed. This sounds really sweet and smart, and there are more interesting tips that experts would love to share with you.

1. Let your baby share a bed with you until age 3.

Some researchers suggest that the safest way for a baby to sleep is to sleep with their mothers. Pediatricians noticed that it might not be safe to put them in another room. 16 infants were studied while sleeping in a crib and on their mother’s chest. Monitors showed that a baby is 3 times more stressed when they sleep alone.

It is the best, according to scientists, if a baby shares a bed with you until the age of 3. At the same time, there is a suggestion that bed-sharing before 4 months isn’t very safe. If you’re holding a newborn on your chest, try not to fall asleep.

2. Don’t pressure your kid to eat more.


Put healthy foods on your table, experts say. In this case, you shouldn’t have to worry about whether your baby is eating unhealthy food or about the amount of food they’re eating. Some parents may force their children to eat because they may think that they are hungry. It is better to not put pressure on a child about food. The same thing goes for diets. Only have healthy options and let your child decide what to eat.

3. Don’t panic if your toddler doesn’t want to use the potty.

Yes, it is good to not have to waste money on diapers every month, but potty training should be done on the child’s time. According to a pediatrician and author of Baby 411there is no right age to start using a potty. Your child just has to be ready for it and show interest. But the approximate time for it is between 2 and 4 years old.

4. Give your toddler choices to teach them to make decisions.

Even a toddler needs to be taught independence. Pediatrician Gwenn Schurgin O’Keeffe says that strict guidelines are not the best option. It is better to not impose your will on toddlers. They need choices. For example, ask your child what he or she prefers for dinner, or what color T-shirt they want to wear.



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